The Other Side of the Glass

Part One was officially released June 2013 in digital distribution format. To purchase to to www.theothersideoftheglass.com If you were a donor and want to download your copy send an email to theothersideoftheglassfilm@gmail.com.

The trailer

Saturday, December 09, 2006

When the Doctor Says, "This is what I would recommend for my own wife,"

don't be fooled into thinking that this means the drug or procedure is safe or based on scientific evidence!

Here is evidence-based, peer-reviewed research from the late eighties and early 90’s. I posted this on Dr. Amy’s blog and it was removed, and I was banned. Meanwhile, she refuses to provide research to show that epidural (NARCOTICS) is safe for the laboring and birthing baby. In fairness, I should admit it's not that she refuses, it's just that it doesn't exist.

I found the following research in 2002 during the healing of my daughter’s birth experience, induced with Cytotec and with epidural anesthesia. My (ex) husband was a medical student and assured me this new pain relief was amazing and safe. My daughter was induced to accommodate moving for his internship. That was uncommon then, but not now. At that time, in January, 1994, it was required to have a medical reason (in MO). As "luck" would have it, I had a craving for a burger (don't cook or eat meat) and had McLean from McDonald's which caused a minor gall bladder attack the month before she was born. WHERE, by the way, is the research to show that it is NOW safe to induce without medical reason?

(I always pause to honor my daughter and her birth whenever I speak of and share it. As a result of doing my healing with my daughter about MY CHOICES that caused her so much emotional and physical distress, I can sit with women in very deep places of regret, anger, shame, and grief in order to heal the breaks with their child in order to deepen their attachment. Her story is on my site at www.infantparenthealing.com)

I was shocked to find the research literature eight years later that clearly shows the danger. I was unable to be angry at her father as I realized how utterly brainwashed he was. In medical school and residency information is crammed into them. It is information to maintain the status quo and to create soldiers to maintain the ranks and file. Obstetric residency -- which my ex did -- looks to me like military boot camp x 10. Sleep deprivation, brow-beating, competition, back-stabbing, separation from family -- for four years. They don’t tend to research the information (time restraints), but they do rely on the information passed on to them by their professors, attending physicians, and chief resident to be accurate. I realized at a profound level that HOW they learn what they do under these conditions (of great time and sacrifice of their lives) is what and why they defend it to the death – as Amy demonstrates. So much so, that they do it to their own loved ones.

So, when your doctor tells you assuringly, “If you were my wife or daughter, or mother, this is what I would recommend” do not make the dangerous assumption that this means what s/he is talking about is based in scientific fact, or that it is safe. But, what it does tell you is just how utterly indoctrinated and brainwashed s/he is that s/he DO recommend unscientific procedures and drug for themselves and their own loved ones. That’s amazing.

“Thinking for yourself” is not a highly regarded attribute in medical school or residency for people who are otherwise extemely good memorizers of information. It's no wonder physicians don't regard "thinking for yourself" when their patients do -- especially pregnant and birthing women. It goes against deeply ingrained beliefs that are generally fear-based. Believe me when I say I know - they are never wrong.

Source: http://www.fensende.com/Users/swnymph/Epidural.html

Maternal complications of epidurals include: [Uitvlugt, A. "Managing complications of Epidural Analgesia" International Anesthesia Clin. 1990;28(1):11-16]
Maternal hypotension(5 studies). This reduces uteroplacental blood supply and can cause fetal distress. (8 studies)
Convulsions (4 studies)
Respiratory paralysis (3 studies).
Cardiac Arrest (6 studies)
Allergic Shock (2 studies)
Maternal nerve injury due to needle injury, poor positioning, forceps injury, infection, hematoma, or subarachnoid injection of chloroprocaine. The last three usually cause permanent injury. (9 studies)
Spinal headache (3 studies)
Increased maternal core temperature. (2 studies)
Temporary urinary incontinence. (1 study)
Long-term backache (weeks to years), headache, migranes, numbness, or tingling. (2 studies)

Serious complications occur despite proper procedure and precautions. The epinephrine test dose can cause complications. (12 studies)

Epidural anesthetics "get" to the baby. (5 studies)

Epidurals do not protect the fetus from distress. In fact, they cause abnormal fetal heart rate, sometimes severe, which may occur with or independant of maternal blood pressure (11% - 43% depending on the study and type of medication used - the 43% was found with Bupivacaine, the most common drug for epidural.) (15 studies)

Stavrou C, et al. "Prolonged fetal bradycardia during epidural analgesia" S Afr Med J 1990;77:66-68

Epidurals may cause neonatal jaundice. (2 studies) [Clark, DA & Landaw, SA. "Bupivacaine alters red blood cell ... jaundice associated with maternal anesthesia" Pediatr. Res. 1985; 19(4):341-343]

Epidurals may cause adverse neonatal behavioral and physical effects. (these are both direct effects and indirect effects from the increased rate of labor complications and interventions.) The importance of this is debated. (4 studies)

Epidural anesthesia may relieve hypertension, but hypertensive women are at particular risk of epidural-induced hypotension, which reduces placental blood supply. (2 studies)

Epidurals substantially increase the incidence of oxytocin augmentation, instrumental delivery, and bladder catheterization. (21 studies cited)

Saunders, NJ, et al. "Oxytocin infusion ... primiparous women using epidural..." BMJ 1989;299:1423-1426

Diro, M. and Beydoun, S. "Segmental epidural analgesia in labor: a matched control study". J Nat Med Assoc 1985;78(1):569-573.

Chestnut, DH, et albupivacaine analgesia on the second stage of labor and method of delivery in nulliparous women". Anesthesiology 1987;66:774-780.

Kaminski, HM, Stafl, A, and Aiman, J. "The effect of epidural analgesia on the frequency of instrumental obstetric delivery". Obstet Gynecol 1987;69(5):770-773.

Philipsen, T and Jensen, NH. "Epidural block or parenteral pethidine as analgesic in labour; a randomized study concerning progress in labour and instrumental deliveries". Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1989;30:27:33.

Gribble, RK and Meier, PR. "Effect of epidural analgesia on the primary cesarean rate". Obstet Gynecol 1991;78(2):231-234.

Thorpe, JA et al. "Epidural analgesia and cesarean section for dystocia: risk factors in nulliparas". Am J Perinatol 1991;8(6):402-410.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Nel, JT. "Clinical effects of epidural block during labor. A prospective study". S Afr Med J 1985;68(6):371-374.

Yancy, MK et al. "Maternal and neonatal effects of outlet forceps delivery compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery in term pregnancies". Obstet Gynecol 1991;78(4):646-650.

Stavrou, C, Hofmeyer, GJ, and Boezaart, AP. "Prolonged fetal bradycardia during epidural analgesia". S Afr Med J 1990;77:66-68.

Eddleston, JM, et al. "Comparison of the maternal and fetal effects associated with intermittent or continuous infusion of extradural analgesia". Br J Anaesth 1992;69:154-158.

Bogod, DG, Rosen, M, and Rees, GAD. "Extradural infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at 10 Ml H-1 to women during labour". Br J Anaesth 1987;59(3):325-330.

Smedstad, KG and Morison, DH. "A comparative study of continuous and intermittent epidural analgesia for labour and delivery". Can J Anaesth 1988;35(3):234-241.

Chestnut, DH et al. "Continuous infusion epidural analgesia during labor: A randomized, double-blind comparison of 0.0625% bupivacaine/0.0002% fentanyl versus 0.125% bupivacaine". Anesthesiol 1988;68:754-759.

In first-time mothers, epidurals substantially increase the cesarean rate for dystocia. This effect may depend on management. (12 studies cited)

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Diro, M. and Beydoun, S. "Segmental epidural analgesia in labor: a matched control study". J Nat Med Assoc 1985;78(1):569-573.
Chestnut, DH, et al. "The influence of continuous epidural bupivacaine analgesia on the second stage of labor and method of delivery in nulliparous women". Anesthesiology 1987;66:774-780.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of continous epidural analgesia on cesarean section for dystocia in nulliparous women". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1989;161(3):670-675.

Philipsen, T and Jensen, NH. "Epidural block or parenteral pethidine as analgesic in labour; a randomized study concerning progress in labour and instrumental deliveries". Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1989;30:27:33.

Gribble, RK and Meier, PR. "Effect of epidural analgesia on the primary cesarean rate". Obstet Gynecol 1991;78(2):231-234.

Thorpe, JA et al. "Epidural analgesia and cesarean section for dystocia: risk factors in nulliparas". Am J Perinatol 1991;8(6):402-410.

Abboud, TK et al. "Continuous infusion epidural analgesia in parturients receiving bupivacaine, chloroprocaine, or lidocaine - maternal, fetal, and neonatal effects". Anesth Analg 1984;63:421-428.

Stavrou C, et al. "Prolonged fetal bradycardia during epidural analgesia". S Afr Med J 1990;77:66-68.

Smedstad, KG and Morison, DH. "A comparative study of continuous and intermittent epidural analgesia for labour and delivery". Can J Anaesth 1988;35(3):234-241.

Epidurals decrease the probability that a posterior or transverse baby will rotate. Oxytocin does not help. (7 studies)

Saunders, NJ, et al. "Oxytocin infusion during second stage of labour in primiparous women using epidural analgesia: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial". BMJ 1989;299:1423-1426.

Thorpe, JA et al. "Epidural analgesia and cesarean section for dystocia: risk factors in nulliparas". Am J Perinatol 1991;8(6):402-410.

Kaminski, HM, Stafl, A, and Aiman, J. "The effect of epidural analgesia on the frequency of instrumental obstetric delivery". Obstet Gynecol 1987;69(5): 770-773.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Having an epidural at 5cm dilation or more eliminates both excess posterior/transverse and excess cesarean for dystocia. (2 studies)

Thorpe, JA et al. "Epidural analgesia and cesarean section for dystocia: risk factors in nulliparas". Am J Perinatol 1991;8(6):402-410.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Epidurals may not relieve any pain or may not relieve all pain. (3 studies)

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Eddleston, JM et al. "Comparison of the maternal and fetal effects associated with intermittent or continuous infusion of extradural analgesia". Br J Anaesth 1992;69:154-158.

Crawford, JS. "Some maternal complications of epidural analgesia for labour". Anesthesia 1985;40(12):1219-1225.

Innovations in procedure - lower dosages, continuous infusion, adding a narcotic - have not decreased epidural related problems. (13 studies)

Naulty, JS. "Continuous infusions of local anesthetics and narcotics for epidural analgesia in the management of labor". (this is a literature review) Int. Anes. Clin. 1990;28(1):17-24.

Diro, M. and Beydoun, S. "Segmental epidural analgesia in labor: a matched control study". J Nat Med Assoc 1985;78(1):569-573.

Chestnut, DH, et al. "The influence of continuous epidural bupivacaine analgesia on the second stage of labor and method of delivery in nulliparous women". Anesthesiology 1987;66:774-780.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of continous epidural analgesia on cesarean section for dystocia in nulliparous women". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1989;161(3):670-675.

Thorpe, JA et al. "Epidural analgesia and cesarean section for dystocia: risk factors in nulliparas". Am J Perinatol 1991;8(6):402-410.

Thorpe, JA et al. "The effect of intrapartum epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor: a randomized, controlled, prospective trial". Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993;169(4):851-858.

Abboud, TK et al. "Continuous infusion epidural analgesia in parturients receiving bupivacaine, chloroprocaine, or lidocaine - maternal, fetal, and neonatal effects". Anesth Analg 1984;63:421-428.

Eddleston, JM, et al. "Comparison of the maternal and fetal effects associated with intermittent or continuous infusion of extradural analgesia". Br J Anaesth 1992;69:154-158.

Bogod, DG, Rosen, M, and Rees, GAD. "Extradural infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at 10 Ml H-1 to women during labour". Br J Anaesth 1987;59(3):325-330.

Smedstad, KG and Morison, DH. "A comparative study of continuous and intermittent epidural analgesia for labour and delivery". Can J Anaesth 1988;35(3):234-241.

Chestnut, DH et al. "Continuous infusion epidural analgesia during labor: A randomized, double-blind comparison of 0.0625% bupivacaine/0.0002% fentanyl versus 0.125% bupivacaine". Anesthesiol 1988;68:754-759.

McLean, BY, Rottman, RL, and Kotelko, DM. "Failure of multiple test doses and techniques to detect intravascular migration of an epidural catheter". Anesth Analg 1992;74(3):454-456.

Delaying pushing until the head has descended to the perineum increases the chances of spontaneous birth. (a time delay of 1 hour is not really delaying - it needs to be a positional not timed thing...)

Evidence is divided as to whether letting the epidural wear off before pushing increases spontaneous delivery. (4 studies)

6 comments:

Heather B. said...

Awesome. I want to also point out that when a doctor says "I have a child in the NICU right now who is blind because her mother declined the silver nitrate eye drops" or something similar, he is probably just being manipulative via deceit. If a doctor tries to tell you that a mother or child died or is dying from not having pitocin, or an amniotomy, or shots, or something of that nature, first ask for documentation, proof of some sort, to see them, etc...and then ask how exactly that is relevant to you, such as what you have in common with them as far as risk factors and what made them most likely have issues from not accepting the interventions. I think that doctors do usually mean well and genuinely believe in what they recommend, but I do not think they are completely 100% educated about EVERYTHING or that they always use accurate, unbiased, factual information to get clients to cooperate. Their job is to get you to do what they think is healthiest for you. Your job is to agree only when you truly agree, based on accurate information and the workings of your own brain!

Safe Baby Partners said...

Heather, YOU are so diplomatic:

"Their job is to get you to do what they think is healthiest for you."

Their job, my dear, is to protect their asses and assets, and the status quo of the hospital.

We ALL know how sales people going through extensive training to be able to market and clinch the sale. Truly, have you ever seen any one more slicker or smoother than a car salesman or an obstetrican??

Heather B said...

I guess I just try to see the good in people. Everyone is motivated by factors that revolve around themselves at some point. Many doctors are motivated by self-profit and self-preservation, like most humans, but I still believe that many of them are just ignorantly recommending what they believe is best. I have encountered many a pediatrician, at least, with good intentions but a lack of good information! My obstetrician actually wasn't too slick at all. He told me to 'breathe this way, push that way.' I told him where he could stick it, and he decided to shut it. ;)

daharja said...

I still find it amazing that the majority of obstetricians are men.

Saying that, I've men one absolute nightmare who was a woman (she told me the day before I went into labour that I was in for a 'very difficult labour' and to expect a poor outcome - then I went on to have a natural birth and a 9 pound, 7 oz healthy boy in just under 3 hours with no complications!).

You've got to love the way some professionals like to instill confidence in their patients, don't you!

Heather B said...

Oh my! That was terrible of her! How can you possibly be expected to have a glorious birth and a wonderful outcome when you are surrounded by such pessimism and negativity?!

Anonymous said...

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Thanks

"Soft is the heart of a child. Do not harden it."

A public awareness reminder that things that happen behind the scenes, out of our sight, aren't always as rosy as we might think them to be. Perhaps its a restaurant cook who accidentally drops your burger on the floor before placing it on the bun and serving it to you. Here it's an overworked apathetic (pathetic) nurse giving my newborn daughter her first bath. Please comment and rate this video, so as to insure that it is viewed as widely as possible, perhaps to prevent other such abuse. -- The mother who posted this YouTube. How NOT to wash a baby on YouTube Are you going to try to tell me that "babies don't remember?" There is no difference to this baby's experience and the imprinting of her nervous system/brain and one that is held and cleaned by the mother or father either at the hospital or at home? By the way, this is probably NOT the baby's first bath. The nurse is ungloved. Medical staff protocol is that they can't handle a baby ungloved until is has been bathed (scrubbed if you've seen it) because the baby is a BIO-HAZARD -- for them. Never mind that the bio-hazard IS the baby's first line of defense against hospital germs.

Missouri Senator Louden Speaks

Finally, A Birth Film for Fathers

Part One of the "The Other Side of the Glass: Finally, A Birth Film for and about Men" was released June, 2013.

Through presentation of the current research and stories of fathers, the routine use of interventions are questioned. How we protect and support the physiological need of the human newborn attachment sequence is the foundation for creating safe birth wherever birth happens.

Based on knowing that babies are sentient beings and the experience of birth is remembered in the body, mind, and soul, fathers are asked to research for themselves what is best for their partner and baby and to prepare to protect their baby.

The film is designed for midwives, doulas, and couples, particularly fathers to work with their caregivers. Doctors and nurses in the medical environment are asked to "be kind" to the laboring, birthing baby, and newborn. They are called to be accountable for doing what science has been so clear about for decades. The mother-baby relationship is core for life. Doctors and nurses and hospital caregivers and administrators are asked to create protocols that protect the mother-baby relationship.

Men are asked to join together to address the vagaries of the medical system that harm their partner, baby and self in the process of the most defining moments of their lives. Men are asked to begin to challenge the system BEFORE they even conceive babies as there is no way to be assured of being able to protect his loved ones once they are in the medical machine, the war zone, on the conveyor belt -- some of the ways that men describe their journey into fatherhood in the medicine culture.

Donors can email theothersideoftheglassfilm@gmail.com to get a digital copy.
Buy the film at www.theothersideoftheglass.com.

The film focuses on the male baby, his journey from the womb to the world and reveals healing and integrating the mother, father, and baby's wounded birth experience. The film is about the restoring of our families, society, and world through birthing loved, protected, and nurtured males (and females, of course). It's about empowering males to support the females to birth humanity safely, lovingly, and consciously.

Finally, a birth film for fathers.

What People Are Saying About the FIlm

Well, I finally had a chance to check out the trailer and .. wow! It's nice that they're acknowledging the father has more than just cursory rights (of course mom's rights are rarely acknowledged either) and it's great that they're bringing out the impact of the experience on the newborn, but I'm really impressed that they're not shying away from the political side.

They are rightly calling what happens in every American maternity unit, every day, by its rightful name - abuse. Abuse of the newborn, abuse of the parents and their rights, abuse of the supposedly sacrosanct ethical principal of patient autonomy and the medico-legal doctrine of informed consent, which has been long ago discarded in all but name. I love it!

In the immortal words of the "shrub", "bring it on!" This film needs to be shown and if I can help facilitate or promote it, let me know.

Father in Asheville, NC


OMG'ess, I just saw the trailer and am in tears. This is so needed. I watch over and over and over as fathers get swallowed in the fear of hospitals birth practice. I need a tool like this to help fathers see how very vital it is for them to protect their partner and baby. I am torn apart every time I see a father stand back and chew his knuckle while his wife is essentially assaulted or his baby is left to lie there screaming.
Please send me more info!!!!
Carrie Hankins
CD(DONA), CCCE, Aspiring Midwife
720-936-3609


Thanks for sharing this. It was very touching to me. I thought of my brother-in-law standing on the other side of the glass when my sister had to have a C-section with her first child because the doctor was missing his golf date. I'll never forget his pacing back and forth and my realizing that he was already a father, even though he hadn't been allowed to be with his son yet.

Margaret, Columbia, MO

In case you don't find me here

Soon, I'll be back to heavy-duty editing and it will be quiet here again. I keep thinking this blog is winding down, and then it revives. It is so important to me.

I wish I'd kept a blog of my journey with this film this past 10 months. It's been amazing.

I have a new blog address for the film, and will keep a journal of simple reporting of the journey for the rest of the film.


www.theothersideoftheglassthefilm.blogspot.com


I'll be heading east this week to meet with a group of men. I plan to post pictures and clips on the film blog.

I'll keep up here when I can -- when I learn something juicy, outrageous, or inspiring related to making birth safer for the birthing baby.

Review of the film

Most of us were born surrounded by people who had no clue about how aware and feeling we were. This trailer triggers a lot of emotions for people if they have not considered the baby's needs and were not considered as a baby. Most of us born in the US were not. The final film will include detailed and profound information about the science-based, cutting-edge therapies for healing birth trauma.

The full film will have the interviews of a wider spectrum of professionals and fathers, and will include a third birth, at home, where the caregivers do a necessary intervention, suctioning, while being conscious of the baby.

The final version will feature OBs, RNs, CNMs, LM, CPM, Doulas, childbirth educators, pre and perinatal psychologists and trauma healing therapists, physiologists, neurologists, speech therapists and lots and lots of fathers -- will hopefully be done in early 2009.

The final version will include the science needed to advocated for delayed cord clamping, and the science that shows when a baby needs to be suctioned and addresses other interventions. Experts in conscious parenting will teach how to be present with a sentient newborn in a conscious, gentle way -- especially when administering life-saving techniques.

The goal is to keep the baby in the mother's arms so that the baby gets all of his or her placental blood and to avoid unnecessary, violating, and abusive touch and interactions. When we do that, whether at home or hospital, with doctor or midwife, the birth is safe for the father. The "trick" for birthing men and women is how to make it happen in the hospital.

Birth Trauma Healing

Ani DeFranco Speaks About Her Homebirth

"Self-Evident" by Ani DeFranco

Patrick Houser at www.Fatherstobe.org

Colin speaks out about interventions at birth

Dolphins